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Start   facts and figures   Architecture   Architecture in Nazi Germany

Architecture in Nazi Germany

This exiting and diverse development abruptly came to an end with the National Socialists.
Many architects went into exile, persecuted as Jews, such as Erich Mendelsohn, or for seeing no chance to continue working as architects, such as Walter Gropius and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe.
Others, like Hans Scharoun and Hugo Häring, stayed in the country but were virtually not allowed to work.
For official public buildings the Nazis propagated a new architecture, which strongly followed classicism, and should, above all, impress with sheer magnitude.
New tenements were built in the "Heimatstil" (native style).
Buildings of this time are the Olympic Stadium, the Waldbühne (an outdoor amphitheater) by Werner March and the Tempelhof Airport by Ernst Sagebiel.
As Hitler's Generalbauinspektor (General Building Inspector), Albert Speer developed gigantic plans for reconstructing Berlin as World-Metropolis "Germania". However, with the beginning of these plan's execution, the "Third Reich" came to its end.

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Ausgang des Stößensees zur Havel
Foto: BBFC
LOCATIONFOTOS © BBFC


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