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Start   facts and figures   The Region   Brandenburg and its Countryside

Brandenburg and its Countryside

The State of Brandenburg has an area of 38.278 square km.
It is located in the North German Lowlands, a rolling landscape mixed with plains.
In the north, the Prignitz, Ruppin, and Uckermark regions border the Mecklenburg Lake District. The Fläming and the hills of Niederlausitz are located in Brandenburg's south.
The broad lowlands lying in between these regions, ( Altmark, Havelland, Barmin, Mittelmark und Neumark), have three ice marginal valleys running through them. These lowlands once were very boggy, but could be won for pastures and arable land by draining.

The most important river is the Elbe with the Havel, the Stepenitz, and the Löcknitz flowing into it.
The Schwieloch Lake, the Ücker Lake, and the Werbellin Lake are among the largest lakes in Brandenburg. A variety of smaller lakes are typical for the region to the south west of Berlin.
The sandy soils, which are widely predominant, are covered with pine tree forests and are favorable for potato, rye, and barley cultivation. Vegetables are extensively grown in the area around Berlin, in the middle Teltow region, the Spreewald, and the Oderbruch.
Fruit-growing is predominant around Potsdam, Werder and in the Guben region.
Brown coal is primarily extracted in the Niederlausitz and near the Oder river.

One of the most popular and interesting guides to the region is the five volume travel book "Journeys Through the March of Brandenburg" written by Theodor Fontane in the 19th century.

key:

1   Brandenburg an der Havel

2   Potsdam

3   Frankfurt an der Oder

4   Cottbus



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